2021 hardcore list of linux without elogind and other systemd tracking devices

        Edited: Dec 30th 2020

This list is going to be short and there may be a sublist of distros with a medium strict standard.  We shall explain what the object is, below the short list (which we hope the community will assist in making longer as we have not been able to currently review the work of every distro and fork.

2021 list of “healthy” hardcore distros in alphabetical order

  1.    Kiss Linux –> k1ss.org
  2.    Kwort Linux –> kwort.org
  3.    Obarun Linux –> obarun.org
  4.    Sabotage Linux  –> sabotage-linux

Hardcore because they seem honest and dedicated to the war against totalitarianism by IBM and other mega corporations to dominate the Open and Free software world.

Continue reading

No systemd, no elogind, no consolekit, no dbus – what did I miss?

Many reviews of linux distros you may read tell you what you need  to have (systemd – elogind – consolekit, – dbus : SECD from now on) to use the distro.  It is rarely seen or heard whether you can have an effective graphical interface, a desktop, a window manager, and not use any of the above.  Sometimes for a rarely used or never used utility you need one of those monsters, but hardly ever anyone goes out of his way to tell you “this is the ONLY instance you need this, otherwise you can do without”.  So the question on this topic should be obvious, “what can I do and have installed, or even if it is installed have it running, without the use of the SECD?”.  The less obvious question to the one questioning is “why?”.  Does anyone still ask why anymore, or have we (linux users) generally turned to fashion monkeys? Continue reading

Will your installation work without dbus? by: Anti-DBus

Remove DBus, ConsoleKit, PolicyKit, PAM, new udev, systemd, freedesktop cancer

by: Anti-DBus

Greetings. I have completed a successful DBus removal. Stragglers were ghostscript-gpl, which was removed, cups, which was also removed and all the dependent programs recompiled to live without it, changing it for lprng (the old Berkeley printer spooler, updated), barring icedtea-bin, which was changed to icedtea and built without any build time dependency, sgt-puzzles (removed), winetricks (sadly removed), qtwidgets (all the programs that needed it were recompiled to not to), qtbittorrent (changed for rtorrent as rutorrent has php and bloat), libreoffice (changed for openoffice-bin, as amazingly it doesn’t have need for dbus or even GTK3; it was chosen to avoid sketchy Chinese poor support and paid support office suites such as WPS and Softmaker), notification-daemon (I actually never used it for anything, ever, as redshift pops up its icon without a notification), nvidia-drivers (recompiled without tools), and such. Continue reading

FigOSdev takes back what he said about Dbus

Maybe I Take Back What I Said About Dbus       by FigOSdev

Despite what I’ve said about worrying about Bus1 (I’m not worried) I’m increasingly of the opinion that getting rid of Dbus or making it easier to remove is a good idea.

The idea is, you shouldn’t have too much software that is running or even installed when you don’t need it. That’s really simple; defining “too much” is not, but…

I have Dbus installed. I am quite capable of finding every file it installs, and removing that file. I can stop it from installing again– no problem!

There are things I have installed that depend on it– probably also not a problem. However, let’s look at what those are: Continue reading

dbus kbus bus1 and dbus-broker – A trojan donkey in drag!

LINUX KERNEL --

Dbus: Will your desktop run without it?  D-Bus (for “Desktop Bus[4]), a software bus, is an inter-process communication (IPC) and remote procedure call (RPC) mechanism that allows communication between multiple computer programs (that is, processes) concurrently running on the same machine.[5][6] D-Bus was developed as part of the freedesktop.org project, initiated by Havoc Pennington from Red Hat to standardize services provided by Linux desktop environments such as GNOME and KDE.

Continue reading