kernelKurtz: What’s up with the hate towards Freedesktop?

kernelKurtz, aka kK, has been a supporter and contributor of this site since its inception.  This came as a comment to an article by FigOSdev on dbus but it deserves its own space.

Here he takes a shot at Freedesktop and gang.

reddit:  What’s up with the hate towards Freedesktop?

It’s not about hate, random reddit OP. But it is about a severe difference in what people think is important.

These corporate persons want standardization and homogeneity on their own terms. They want open source cachet and finding a way to monetize it, and they don’t give a rat’s ass about the four freedoms, or what happens to the people that Bill Gates once sneered at as “hobbyists”. They are Google and Microsoft and everyone else who can afford to buy a seat on the board of the Linux Foundation. Red Hat probably too, sad to say. Their motto is do no evil, until evil is profitable, and then pick another slogan, because buttering the bread is what life is all about. Continue reading

FigOSdev takes back what he said about Dbus

Maybe I Take Back What I Said About Dbus       by FigOSdev

Despite what I’ve said about worrying about Bus1 (I’m not worried) I’m increasingly of the opinion that getting rid of Dbus or making it easier to remove is a good idea.

The idea is, you shouldn’t have too much software that is running or even installed when you don’t need it. That’s really simple; defining “too much” is not, but…

I have Dbus installed. I am quite capable of finding every file it installs, and removing that file. I can stop it from installing again– no problem!

There are things I have installed that depend on it– probably also not a problem. However, let’s look at what those are: Continue reading

dbus kbus bus1 and dbus-broker – A trojan donkey in drag!

LINUX KERNEL --

Dbus: Will your desktop run without it?  D-Bus (for “Desktop Bus[4]), a software bus, is an inter-process communication (IPC) and remote procedure call (RPC) mechanism that allows communication between multiple computer programs (that is, processes) concurrently running on the same machine.[5][6] D-Bus was developed as part of the freedesktop.org project, initiated by Havoc Pennington from Red Hat to standardize services provided by Linux desktop environments such as GNOME and KDE.

Continue reading