Xcha-cha, NSA’s speck & simon, google and the kernel

Bits and pieces, some underlined and emphasized, from an article by Lucian Armasu:

by Lucian Armasu – Source: Kernel.org

The NSA-designed Speck encryption algorithm will be removed from version 4.20 of the Linux kernel, after just recently being added to the Linux kernel version 4.17 in June. The move comes after the International Standards Organization (ISO) rejected two of NSA’s cryptographic designs, Simon and Speck, on the basis of not being trustworthy….. Continue reading

Linux-Ck whose side are you on?

Back a while ago while fighting the Devuan troll-monsters we dedicated this song/video to those that dare to raise their head and their voice to hierarchy enforcement.

In this case we dared ask the leading developer/maintainer for linux-ck, code named graysky, while struggling to leap from linux-4.16-16 to 4.17 whether he would leave the NSA’s proposed encryption module enabled, disabled, or write it off all together.  At first he pretended he did not see the question, then he admitted that he did see it, chose not to answer, and then answered that he wasn’t going to alter the kernel.  This is  linux-ck, a hacked, modified, “optimized”, kernel for desktop users.  Continue reading

Speck: Before you use Linux 4.17 read about it

It seems that “Speck” is a long term project to standardize encryption that goes around the internet.  It seems as the NSA has been the primary force proposing what is “pretty good” encryption and what is not.  It doesn’t take a genius to assume that only encryption that can be decrypted by the NSA can be proposed.  So this set of new rules is making its way into your open and free software.  It is in Linux 4.17, not on 4.16 or previous ones, and 4.17.1 was just announced as stable yesterday. Continue reading