zstd compression algorithm and the dethroned old king xz

Here is the comparative numbers reported by Arch devs on which they based their decision to use this fast but resource hungry compression tool.  XZ still wins in size, loses on time, while ZSTD is a huge loser in memory use while compressing; decompressing is comparable and equally fast.  Zstd (gang) software also relies heavily on very current powerful server grade machines to provide the benefit of speed, to make up what it lacks in quality.   Compression software should primarily be judged on their ability to compress, and zstd fails miserably against this 45 year old trusty switchblade called xz.  So we can conclude that arch has an abundance of computing/building/packaging apparatus, with truck loads of spare ram to parallely process many packages.

Arch comparison test ZSTD vs XZMy article (a link to it) was removed from r/linux yesterday for no good reason, 100% linux related material, and as I complained I was permanently banned from posting there.

https://www.reddit.com/r/linux/comments/ejn5c5/arch_2020_welcomes_its_little_brothers_and/

In case you are wondering I was reporting that arch nearly silently started using this facebook compression algorithm on packaging and here is their own test data to support this decision: Continue reading

Xcha-cha, NSA’s speck & simon, google and the kernel

Bits and pieces, some underlined and emphasized, from an article by Lucian Armasu:

by Lucian Armasu – Source: Kernel.org

The NSA-designed Speck encryption algorithm will be removed from version 4.20 of the Linux kernel, after just recently being added to the Linux kernel version 4.17 in June. The move comes after the International Standards Organization (ISO) rejected two of NSA’s cryptographic designs, Simon and Speck, on the basis of not being trustworthy….. Continue reading

Linux-Ck whose side are you on?

Back a while ago while fighting the Devuan troll-monsters we dedicated this song/video to those that dare to raise their head and their voice to hierarchy enforcement.

In this case we dared ask the leading developer/maintainer for linux-ck, code named graysky, while struggling to leap from linux-4.16-16 to 4.17 whether he would leave the NSA’s proposed encryption module enabled, disabled, or write it off all together.  At first he pretended he did not see the question, then he admitted that he did see it, chose not to answer, and then answered that he wasn’t going to alter the kernel.  This is  linux-ck, a hacked, modified, “optimized”, kernel for desktop users.  Continue reading

Speck: Before you use Linux 4.17 read about it

It seems that “Speck” is a long term project to standardize encryption that goes around the internet.  It seems as the NSA has been the primary force proposing what is “pretty good” encryption and what is not.  It doesn’t take a genius to assume that only encryption that can be decrypted by the NSA can be proposed.  So this set of new rules is making its way into your open and free software.  It is in Linux 4.17, not on 4.16 or previous ones, and 4.17.1 was just announced as stable yesterday. Continue reading