Arch Linux 2020 – what’s there to be happy about?

Happy new year facebook fans and Arch friends (friends of who? we don’t know, not us, not on facebook, not in the past and not in the future, but you must have friends amongst yourselves).

Some of you may have taken the previous post about abandoning Arch as a joke, since most of what we do recently is promote Obarun, an Arch based distribution with s6 and 66 init and service management.   When we published that article we knew nothing of what Hyperbola was planning to do (we assume it was discussed within the community) or whether they were going to give-in to the pressure and incorporate arch’s pacman and packaging methodology change into their distribution.  (Note: Hyperbola may be based on Arch but has its own separate repositories and rebuilds everything on their own to ensure everything is Free).  All of their free packages, as far as we can tell are still compressed with xz.  The bomb was set and it will go off soon (in open/free software tradition of timing kind of soon).  Hyperbola is not just leaving Arch, it is leaving linux, for OpenBSD.  But this is not about hyperbola, it is about Arch….     or skip to here if you are in a rush! Continue reading

Where to move to after Arch-Linux-based non-systemd systems?

VD, HIV, STD, Zstd

The deeper issue here is “what is the relationship of Arch-Linux and Orwell?”

Two of the most common intrusive sites reported by linux users that are placed on top of the list of a firewall, so nothing goes in and out between their machine and those sites’ servers, are Google and Facebook.  Google on the one hand, in order to play nice against the free/open software community, has been contributing resources, information, and free/open software to improve their image.  MS purchased github, IBM purchased RedHat, or should we say they made their relationship more formal.  Some developers have fallen for it.  Facebook on the other hand is notorious of flooding the machines of their innocent and unsuspecting users with questionable code.  Facebook not only knows who you really are, what you really like, what you think and what you are interested in, in the vast majority of cases they know in real time your exact location and may even have the capability of keeping track of your moves.  Simply if you have an account on facebook and accessed it once through your “smart” phone, they know.  If you access facebook from your desktop, but on smart phone you only use your google account, they know.  They, they, who is they?  If you are really asking we can go on comments for as far as you can take it. Continue reading

ArchLabs without systemd – Obarun s6 on top

You may ask what we are doing with ArchLabs when there is a tremendous amount of original non-systemd based distros on the list (our own lists for example).   “Originally a minimalist, Arch-based live distribution with Openbox, the latest release of ArchLabs Linux is a radical departure from the original concept as the distribution is now designed for users who like to customise their system during installation. ”  It may be coincidental but the installer is following a bit on the Obarun fashion where you install what you need and like and not what the distribution has chosen.  Continue reading

Cross reference table for package management (apt pacman emerge — debian arch gentoo)

For arch, debian, gentoo, users who want to try one of the other two distributions or their derivatives, one of the obstacles is package management.  It is the primary thing among linux distributions that differs and when a user has become accustomed to one, the other will just not do. You frequently hear “arch is wonderful but pacman is a pain in ….”, or “debian is great but I just can’t stand apt”.   And everyone hates emerge.  In a way they can all do what the others do just that the format of the commands and the procedures behind the commands differ.  After all, whether binary or code, you download it, or copy it from somewhere, then you compile it if it is not already compiled, then install it and its dependent files in the appropriate locations in the system.

Arch wiki has a great table and article on this specific subject, wiki.archlinux.org Pacman/Rosetta it only incorporates RH and OpenSuse, which we don’t want to reproduce here.  We edited the table to make it more specific on those three systems, debian (based as in Refracta, Antix, MX, Devuan, etc), arch (based, artix, obarun, hyperbola, archbang), and Gentoo (redcore, CloverOS, etc). Continue reading

Artix new repository structure for testing [gremlins]

The new repository structure for testing in artix follows the pattern of arch and substituting labels to avoid confusion.

Gremlins is the term for what Arch calls testing, and goblins is the term for what Arch calls staging (where dev.’s place new packages while they are being debugged and getting ready for production –> testing).  For users not willing to contribute to development, other than “testing” their work, goblins is no place to be.  Most certainly things will be “broken” in goblins, and if they weren’t they would be in testing, or to be distribution correct “gremlins”.  For stable users, nothing has changed. Continue reading

Dealing with pacman’s updated .conf files

Read the edited WARNING at the bottom of the article! (Oct 17 2017)

Merge-arrows-2.pngArtix, being a modified distribution of ARCH-linux, follows Arch’s policy of updating packages and their corresponding .conf files.  In other distributions like Debian, you have to do work to protect your custom .conf files as sometimes updated packages replace your .conf files with new ones.  In Arch/Artix/Arch-Bang/Obarun etc. when a package incorporates a conf file that is new it installs a pkg-name.conf.pacnew and even when it is essential that the new conf file is mandatory for the package to work, or when the package is removed, Continue reading