antiX – runit – brief stop and onto s6 and 66 : How to

1st some history/background:
Back some time ago an alternative to sysvinit was developed called daemontools (look at sources below) and people liked it.   From “it” runit was cloned, very similar but started from scratch, to be as small, as light, as simple, and as responsive as hw itself.  Runit set some goals for its development, kept being refined and eliminating any bugs, it worked on as many architectures as people could get their hands on, and the chief runit man decided to put it to bed.  Runit has been frozen in time by its developer.  Don’t expect it to catch up with other system development unless Void decides to clone it and develop it on their own, which in some ways they already do, but it is more polishing up the existing runit.

Continue reading

Are you confused about debian/antiX/MX/devuan/Refracta editions?

Debian 10 Buster became stable a few months ago, the rest of the systems had to follow but took their time.  This is done every two years and creates a wave of confusion, especially those on forked versions of Debian, like antiX, MX, devuan, refracta, etc.  Even more dangerous and confusing it is if you are using testing and although testing during debian stretch was buster it now becomes bullseye, while your antiX/MX/Devuan is testing alongside Buster still.

After antiX announced 19 (Marielle Franco) as its current stable branch, MS followed its mothership the week later (a few days ago), while Devuan/Refracta are still chasing Stretch (Debian 9), what they call Devuan 2 or ascii.

So here it is, to take the confusion away from numbers and names:

Debian         *   Debian       *  AntiX/MX   *  Devuan
the last good1 *   7   Wheezy   *    13       *  0  beta-testing
old old stable *   8   Jessie   *    15       *  1 jessie (old-stable)
old stable     *   9   Stretch  *    17       *  2 ascii (stable)
stable         *  10   Buster   *    19       *  3 beowulf(testing)
testing        *  11   Bullseye *    21       *  4 chimaera (next testing)
unstable       *       sid      *    sid      *       ceres

Continue reading

Debian based distibutions without systemd running testing

Beware:

If you have been running testing while Stretch (9) was stable you were indirectly following Debian Buster (10).  Since debian 10 Buster became stable today July 7th, those using testing instead of Buster repositories will be automatically jumping to the next release, called Bullseye (Debian 11).  The official Devuan repositories automatically “merge” debian and devuan packages, so testing will remain Buster till Devuan releases 3 (Beowulf) and therefore testing will become Devuan Chimaera.  If manually you have added Debian testing be careful of incompatibilities.  (some people do this, will swap Devuan merged for Devuan/devuan, and add a debian repository directly). Continue reading

Microsoft advice

If there is a problem with your system

reinstall

But not in Linux, come on guys, and gals, we can do better than that.  Say you don’t have the time to figure it out, say there is a point of no return with some changes (there is never such point, even in Debian, it just takes careful steps to retract from sid to wheezy), say it is not worth it, or say that you are clueless of what could have gone wrong. Continue reading

On the question of Arch based, Debian based, and independent

Now that our single Debian person has distanced *self from Devuan (systemd free Debian) and the rest of us made a new Arch person, we must answer a question relating to the discontinuity of Devuan coverage.  What is so different in Arch world from the Debian world?  Why is this importance in tor/onion networking internal to Debian that is less relevant in Arch?  We have identified several attributes that we consider different.

Continue reading

U/EFI secure boot and debian/microsoft-ization

A short story: In recent years PCs have increasingly shifted from having a bios in charge of booting, whatever system can possibly boot from, to a system called EFI.  EFI in brief seeks a boot partition on disk that can be edited and filled with OS instructions on how the kernel of a system will be initialized and built.  A UEFI is a more specific form of an EFI that also introduces secure boot.  This means that only certain systems that are considered as “safe” can boot and such systems are certified and are issued a key (for a hefty fee of course). Continue reading

Freak Devuan experiment that did not backfire Devian/Debuan

As Devuan users have not been getting any feedback for why have things become so stale for two months, there are no updates seen in Jessie or Ascii, while the Debian train is running away with a daily influx of updated packages, there is not much convinvcing anyone can do for people to be patient.  Having bugs to deal with is one thing, not having bugs and expecting things to just evolve is a different issue.  So I thought what if?

What if questions sometimes break the best of systems.  So I cleaned my ascii installation and backed it up (using the classic dd on the installation’s partition).  If it broke I would not try to fix it too much, I’d rather just restore it and report back how and when it broke so others wouldn’t try the same thing. Continue reading