Debian based distros beware of apt clearing your cache

These past few days when apt and its coworkers were updated, apt by default deletes cached packages after the installation.  So if you were used to keep the cached pkgs so you can reinstall without redownloading, or sharing your cache with other installations, or using a common cache in a network to save bandwidth, DO NOT USE APT, USE APT-GET.  Continue reading

Cross reference table for package management (apt pacman emerge — debian arch gentoo)

For arch, debian, gentoo, users who want to try one of the other two distributions or their derivatives, one of the obstacles is package management.  It is the primary thing among linux distributions that differs and when a user has become accustomed to one, the other will just not do. You frequently hear “arch is wonderful but pacman is a pain in ….”, or “debian is great but I just can’t stand apt”.   And everyone hates emerge.  In a way they can all do what the others do just that the format of the commands and the procedures behind the commands differ.  After all, whether binary or code, you download it, or copy it from somewhere, then you compile it if it is not already compiled, then install it and its dependent files in the appropriate locations in the system.

Arch wiki has a great table and article on this specific subject, wiki.archlinux.org Pacman/Rosetta it only incorporates RH and OpenSuse, which we don’t want to reproduce here.  We edited the table to make it more specific on those three systems, debian (based as in Refracta, Antix, MX, Devuan, etc), arch (based, artix, obarun, hyperbola, archbang), and Gentoo (redcore, CloverOS, etc). Continue reading

Freak Devuan experiment that did not backfire Devian/Debuan

As Devuan users have not been getting any feedback for why have things become so stale for two months, there are no updates seen in Jessie or Ascii, while the Debian train is running away with a daily influx of updated packages, there is not much convinvcing anyone can do for people to be patient.  Having bugs to deal with is one thing, not having bugs and expecting things to just evolve is a different issue.  So I thought what if?

What if questions sometimes break the best of systems.  So I cleaned my ascii installation and backed it up (using the classic dd on the installation’s partition).  If it broke I would not try to fix it too much, I’d rather just restore it and report back how and when it broke so others wouldn’t try the same thing. Continue reading