Linux-Ck whose side are you on?

Back a while ago while fighting the Devuan troll-monsters we dedicated this song/video to those that dare to raise their head and their voice to hierarchy enforcement.

In this case we dared ask the leading developer/maintainer for linux-ck, code named graysky, while struggling to leap from linux-4.16-16 to 4.17 whether he would leave the NSA’s proposed encryption module enabled, disabled, or write it off all together.  At first he pretended he did not see the question, then he admitted that he did see it, chose not to answer, and then answered that he wasn’t going to alter the kernel.  This is  linux-ck, a hacked, modified, “optimized”, kernel for desktop users.  Continue reading

History of Arch without systemd

archartixWhile researching the development of consolekit and its fork, consolekit2, I run into a really interesting thread in the Arch forum.  This was the beginning of Arch-OpenRC it seems and this is how the Arch hierarchy dealt with the inquiry and proposals.  The very first thing they did was to hide the thread from search engines, visible only to registered users.  Then they tried to push the guy in pursuit of this project to do what he wants elsewhere, not seek collaboration through the Arch forum.  The guy is none other than @Artoo, the force behind the Manjaro-OpenRC project, and one of the people who last year founded Artix. Continue reading

Cross reference table for package management (apt pacman emerge — debian arch gentoo)

For arch, debian, gentoo, users who want to try one of the other two distributions or their derivatives, one of the obstacles is package management.  It is the primary thing among linux distributions that differs and when a user has become accustomed to one, the other will just not do. You frequently hear “arch is wonderful but pacman is a pain in ….”, or “debian is great but I just can’t stand apt”.   And everyone hates emerge.  In a way they can all do what the others do just that the format of the commands and the procedures behind the commands differ.  After all, whether binary or code, you download it, or copy it from somewhere, then you compile it if it is not already compiled, then install it and its dependent files in the appropriate locations in the system.

Arch wiki has a great table and article on this specific subject, wiki.archlinux.org Pacman/Rosetta it only incorporates RH and OpenSuse, which we don’t want to reproduce here.  We edited the table to make it more specific on those three systems, debian (based as in Refracta, Antix, MX, Devuan, etc), arch (based, artix, obarun, hyperbola, archbang), and Gentoo (redcore, CloverOS, etc). Continue reading

On the question of Arch based, Debian based, and independent

Now that our single Debian person has distanced *self from Devuan (systemd free Debian) and the rest of us made a new Arch person, we must answer a question relating to the discontinuity of Devuan coverage.  What is so different in Arch world from the Debian world?  Why is this importance in tor/onion networking internal to Debian that is less relevant in Arch?  We have identified several attributes that we consider different.

Continue reading

Switching keyboard maps on openbox

In many common desktops there is a panel/taskbar combination that incorporates an available gadget/add-on “thingy” that you can click and switch between keyboard maps.  You may have customized maps or standard language mappings.  It will not change the painted characters on your keyboard but it will tell the system what character is on which combination of keys.  Openbox, out of the box, does not have such luxury.  Continue reading

Dealing with pacman’s updated .conf files

Read the edited WARNING at the bottom of the article! (Oct 17 2017)

Merge-arrows-2.pngArtix, being a modified distribution of ARCH-linux, follows Arch’s policy of updating packages and their corresponding .conf files.  In other distributions like Debian, you have to do work to protect your custom .conf files as sometimes updated packages replace your .conf files with new ones.  In Arch/Artix/Arch-Bang/Obarun etc. when a package incorporates a conf file that is new it installs a pkg-name.conf.pacnew and even when it is essential that the new conf file is mandatory for the package to work, or when the package is removed, Continue reading